Negligence and Car Damage

Posted by on Feb 17, 2017 in Car Accidents | 0 comments

According to the Association for Safe International Road Travel over 37,000 individuals are killed in road crashes each year. A significant portion of the population is well versed on the contributions of alcohol and other mind-altering substances to these statistics; however, negligence, a lesser-known influencer of fatal accidents, often goes unmentioned.

According to Mazin & Associates, PC, car accidents occur every single day. Most damages to motor vehicles are caused by an individual’s intentional or unintentional negligence. In inclement weathers for instance, an individual’s lack of knowledge during these extenuating circumstance can be the difference between life and death. A person born and raised in the California may be ill prepared for the snow and black ice of Michigan. In such adverse conditions, a car is prone to sliding on ice. The individual may not possess the adequate driving knowledge or experience to know how to react to such a condition. Alternatively, a driver who is educated on such harsh environmental conditions may also get into a car accident. Someone who is overly confidence of his or her driving skills in harsh weathers may develop a false sense of security, which can induce reckless behaviors such as speeding in a storm.

Shopping carts are another example of how negligence can cause car damages. An individual in a hurry may forget to put a cart away; or alternatively, a particularly lazy individual may intentionally leave a cart unattended. In the event of a strong wind, these seemingly harmless instruments can cause a significant amount of damage onto an individual’s vehicle. Indeed, there is a large amount of queries regarding runaway carts and the liabilities involved.

Tailgating, the intentional act of driving unbearably close to another vehicle causes a significant number of vehicle accidents. A driver with a disregard for safety may tail another car in order to inform the individual in front to move faster or switch lanes. This kind of activity can lead to rear-end collisions.

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